Exploring TheGraf
Well see what you wanna see. You should see it all.
Well take what you want from me. You deserve it all.
Nine times out of ten our hearts just get dissolved.
Well I want a better place or just a better way to fall.
Exploring TheGraf
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ruo:

water by Judy
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leslieseuffert:

Lizzie Buckmaster Dove (Australia) Year of Walking, 2014
leslieseuffert:

Lizzie Buckmaster Dove (Australia) Year of Walking, 2014
leslieseuffert:

Lizzie Buckmaster Dove (Australia) Year of Walking, 2014
leslieseuffert:

Lizzie Buckmaster Dove (Australia) Year of Walking, 2014
leslieseuffert:

Lizzie Buckmaster Dove (Australia) Year of Walking, 2014
leslieseuffert:

Lizzie Buckmaster Dove (Australia) Year of Walking, 2014
leslieseuffert:

Lizzie Buckmaster Dove (Australia) Year of Walking, 2014
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collectorsweekly:

When telephone and telegraph wires filled our urban skies.
collectorsweekly:

When telephone and telegraph wires filled our urban skies.
collectorsweekly:

When telephone and telegraph wires filled our urban skies.
collectorsweekly:

When telephone and telegraph wires filled our urban skies.
collectorsweekly:

When telephone and telegraph wires filled our urban skies.
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sunrec:

"Etretat, France" by Götz Göppert
sunrec:

"Etretat, France" by Götz Göppert
sunrec:

"Etretat, France" by Götz Göppert
sunrec:

"Etretat, France" by Götz Göppert
sunrec:

"Etretat, France" by Götz Göppert
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climateadaptation:

Some climate adaptation ideas - build canals - for the great city of Boston.

Boston’s solution to sea level rise
A report scheduled to be released Tuesday about preparing Boston for climate change suggests that building canals through the Back Bay neighborhood would help it withstand water levels that could rise as much as 7 feet by 2100. Some roads and public alleys, such as Clarendon Street, could be turned into narrow waterways, the report suggests, allowing the neighborhood to absorb the rising sea with clever engineering projects that double as public amenities.
The canal system was among the more imaginative solutions offered by some of the city’s leading planning, architecture, and engineering firms in a report compiled by the local chapter of the Urban Land Institute.
Other suggestions include raising the Harborwalk, which rings the waterfront, to act as a stronger barrier for nearby buildings, adding breakwaters in the harbor, and creating wetlands that would act as sponges during periods of high water.
The authors said the ideas are intended to show how the region can respond creatively to the dramatic effects of climate change.
Via Boston Globe
climateadaptation:

Some climate adaptation ideas - build canals - for the great city of Boston.

Boston’s solution to sea level rise
A report scheduled to be released Tuesday about preparing Boston for climate change suggests that building canals through the Back Bay neighborhood would help it withstand water levels that could rise as much as 7 feet by 2100. Some roads and public alleys, such as Clarendon Street, could be turned into narrow waterways, the report suggests, allowing the neighborhood to absorb the rising sea with clever engineering projects that double as public amenities.
The canal system was among the more imaginative solutions offered by some of the city’s leading planning, architecture, and engineering firms in a report compiled by the local chapter of the Urban Land Institute.
Other suggestions include raising the Harborwalk, which rings the waterfront, to act as a stronger barrier for nearby buildings, adding breakwaters in the harbor, and creating wetlands that would act as sponges during periods of high water.
The authors said the ideas are intended to show how the region can respond creatively to the dramatic effects of climate change.
Via Boston Globe
climateadaptation:

Some climate adaptation ideas - build canals - for the great city of Boston.

Boston’s solution to sea level rise
A report scheduled to be released Tuesday about preparing Boston for climate change suggests that building canals through the Back Bay neighborhood would help it withstand water levels that could rise as much as 7 feet by 2100. Some roads and public alleys, such as Clarendon Street, could be turned into narrow waterways, the report suggests, allowing the neighborhood to absorb the rising sea with clever engineering projects that double as public amenities.
The canal system was among the more imaginative solutions offered by some of the city’s leading planning, architecture, and engineering firms in a report compiled by the local chapter of the Urban Land Institute.
Other suggestions include raising the Harborwalk, which rings the waterfront, to act as a stronger barrier for nearby buildings, adding breakwaters in the harbor, and creating wetlands that would act as sponges during periods of high water.
The authors said the ideas are intended to show how the region can respond creatively to the dramatic effects of climate change.
Via Boston Globe
climateadaptation:

Some climate adaptation ideas - build canals - for the great city of Boston.

Boston’s solution to sea level rise
A report scheduled to be released Tuesday about preparing Boston for climate change suggests that building canals through the Back Bay neighborhood would help it withstand water levels that could rise as much as 7 feet by 2100. Some roads and public alleys, such as Clarendon Street, could be turned into narrow waterways, the report suggests, allowing the neighborhood to absorb the rising sea with clever engineering projects that double as public amenities.
The canal system was among the more imaginative solutions offered by some of the city’s leading planning, architecture, and engineering firms in a report compiled by the local chapter of the Urban Land Institute.
Other suggestions include raising the Harborwalk, which rings the waterfront, to act as a stronger barrier for nearby buildings, adding breakwaters in the harbor, and creating wetlands that would act as sponges during periods of high water.
The authors said the ideas are intended to show how the region can respond creatively to the dramatic effects of climate change.
Via Boston Globe
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faredisfare:

Matjaz Cater, Dawn
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"Cosmos is a Greek word for the order of the universe. It is, in a way, the opposite of Chaos. It implies the deep interconnectedness of all things. It conveys awe for the intricate and subtle way in which the universe is put together."
Carl Sagan, Cosmos  (via wordsnquotes)
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fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Designer Eleanor Lutz used high-speed video of five different flying species to create this graphic illustrating the curves swept out in their wingbeats. The curves are constructed from 15 points per wingbeat and are intended more as art than science, but they’re a fantastic visualization of several important concepts in flapping flight. For example, note the directionality of the curves as a whole. If you imagine a vector perpendicular to the wing curves, you’ll notice that the bat, goose, and dragonfly would all have vectors pointing forward and slightly upward. In contrast, the moth and hummingbird would have vectors pointing almost entirely upward. This is because the moth and hummingbird are hovering, so their wing strokes are oriented so that the force produced balances their weight. The bat, goose, and dragonfly are all engaged in forward flight, so the aerodynamic force they generate is directed to counter their weight and to provide thrust. (Image credit: E. Lutz; via io9)
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"If there was a (booby) prize for the most misused design cliché, a firm favorite would be “form follows function,” with “less is more” coming a close second.
Not only is “form follows …” often quoted incorrectly, it is not even accurate: the original wording was “form ever follows function.” It is also routinely misattributed, mostly to 20th-century modernist grandees, like Le Corbusier and Mies van der Rohe, but was actually coined by the less famous American architect, Louis Sullivan.
Misused though Sullivan’s quote has been, his point, that the style of architecture should reflect its purpose, made sense at the time, and continued to do so for much of the last century, not just for buildings, but objects too. That was then. Thanks to digital technology, designers can squeeze so many functions into such tiny containers that there is more computing power in a basic cellphone than at NASA’s headquarters when it began in 1958. That is why the appearance of most digital products bears no relation to what they do."
Alice Rawthorn, The New York Times, May 30, 2009. (via breathnaigh)
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ignitelight:

(via Studio Space in the Southern Highlands - The Generalist)
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historical-nonfiction:

interesting architecture from Machu Picchu
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scavengedluxury:

Ljubljanski grad. Slovenia, September 2014.